Category: Bourbon Law

Old Lexington Club – An Early Bourbon Lesson in Protecting Brand Names.

Consumers often wonder why trademark owners seem to sue competitors so often over allegedly-infringing names.  A bourbon lawsuit from 1916 helps provide the answer. The February 1, 1906 edition of The Wine and Spirits Bulletin reported that the G. & B. Gerdes Company—owners of…

Bourbon takes on the L&N Railroad—two titans of the late 1800’s, a fire-breathing locomotive, and bourbon set ablaze…

Not many industries could compete with railroad companies after the Civil War through the early 1900’s.  Railroads had reputations for using their power to price-gouge farmers, for otherwise being ruthless and greedy, and for having a wanton disregard for public safety.  The public started…

Kentucky Vintage Spirts Sales Start Slow.

Even outside of Kentucky, bourbon enthusiasts know that last year Kentucky passed House Bill 100, which was then signed into law by Governor Matt Bevin, permitting private sales of “vintage distilled spirits” to specially-licensed retailers.  This was a much-welcomed exception to the general rule…

Working in a Distillery at the Turn of the Century; Unsafe at any Proof.

I’ve written previously about how Bourbon gave the United States its first consumer protection law with the Bottled in Bond Act of 1897, and how the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 was influenced by the conflict between “straight” and “rectified” whiskey, but…

A Modest Bourbon Proposal for the Secondary Market.

Before I jump in, some people have articulated that selling or trading whiskey for collectability is perfectly legal.  I don’t agree, but I’m not giving anyone legal advice, and if any reader has questions about it, I encourage consultation with counsel.   With that…