Tag: Trademark

Sipp’n Corn Bourbon Law Update – Bulleit forces a redesign for Redemption.

Ever since Old Crow and Old Taylor aggressively protected their trademarks in the 1800’s, setting the stage for current-day trademark law, bourbon brands have kept trademark attorneys busy. Diageo’s Bulleit brand and W.J. Deutsch & Sons’ Redemption brand have been locked in litigation for… Continue ReadingSipp’n Corn Bourbon Law Update – Bulleit forces a redesign for Redemption.

Bourbon History Matters as a Matter of Law

I’m pleased to announce that The Kentucky Journal of Equine, Agriculture, & Natural Resources has published an article that I wrote with Melissa Whitehead, a former associate at my firm who helped with the Sazerac v. Peristyle litigation.  The 2018 ruling by the Sixth Circuit—on National Bourbon Day… Continue Reading “Bourbon History Matters as a Matter of Law”

Old Lexington Club – An Early Bourbon Lesson in Protecting Brand Names.

Consumers often wonder why trademark owners seem to sue competitors so often over allegedly-infringing names.  A bourbon lawsuit from 1916 helps provide the answer. The February 1, 1906 edition of The Wine and Spirits Bulletin reported that the G. & B. Gerdes Company—owners of… Continue Reading “Old Lexington Club – An Early Bourbon Lesson in Protecting Brand Names.”

The Duke v. Duke University – and what’s Wild Turkey got to do with this?

*Updated August 8, 2014 after Duke University filed a Motion to Dismiss in response to the Complaint, and after numerous requests to Duke Spirits and Wild Turkey for information. Last week John Wayne Enterprises, LLC sued Duke University over the use of John Wayne’s… Continue Reading “The Duke v. Duke University – and what’s Wild Turkey got to do with this?”

James E. Pepper’s Fraud Previews The Taft Decision.

There’s a rule in the law that when you ask for an injunction, you can’t have been a bad guy too.  In 1893 when James E. Pepper tried to protect his “Old Pepper” brand, he learned this rule the hard way. The events described… Continue Reading “James E. Pepper’s Fraud Previews The Taft Decision.”